Prevention of microbial defacement


  • Fungicide for use in: adhesives, paints, paper, air filters, plastics, textiles, nylon carpeting etc.
  • Broad spectrum of activity.
  • Thermally stable, no yellowing.
  • Excellent toxicological profile.

Dry Film Preservation

Dry paint films are vulnerable to a variety of microorganisms that provide a basis for algal, fungal, moss, or lichen growth and cause severe problems, such as discoloration and physical degradation.

Physical deterioration leads to an increase in porosity of the surface coating, loss of adhesion to the substrate, and moisture penetration, which results in the decay of the underlying substrate.

Algae are one of the two main organisms encountered on exterior coatings that actually disfigure the dry paint film. Unfortunately, they are sometimes confused with fungi, especially if they are brown or orange instead of green, which is more common.

Algae growth requires high humidity, a neutral to alkaline environment, and light to allow photosynthesis. To facilitate growth, algae also need trace minerals, which they can find on masonry surfaces.

Representative algal species found on contaminated paint surfaces include Chlorella, Chlorococcum, Oscillatoria and Trentepohilia.

Fungal growth prevails on north-facing walls. It is also commonly found in places where shrubbery or shaded trees restrict rapid surface drying. Paints protected from direct rainfall tend to accumulate detritus, thus providing nutrients for fungi.

In general, fungi develop more commonly on paint applied on wood surfaces than on metal or masonry, because of the rougher surface. Wood substrates are also thought to provide nutrients from the water-soluble extractives that diffuse into the paint film.

The most common fungal species found on contaminated dry paint film are: Aureobasidium, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cladosporium and Penicillium. However, the dominant fungal species will vary significantly, depending on the climate, the substrate and the condition of the paint film itself.

Dry film preservatives are typically blends of an algaecide and one or more fungicides, designed to ensure resistance to a broad range of algae and fungi. The blends are added to the architectural paint, which is then applied to a variety of exterior surfaces.

Broad-spectrum protection for mold, mildew and algae.

 Physical deterioration leads to an increase in porosity of the surface coating, loss of adhesion to the substrate, and moisture penetration, which results in the decay of the underlying substrate.

Fungicides offer highly effective, broad-spectrum protection against degradation, discoloration and defacement caused by mold, mildew and algae and used primarily as a dry-film mildew protector for paint, coatings, stains, and more. Other applications include adhesives and printing inks.

Fungal growth prevails on north-facing walls. It is commonly found in places where shrubbery or shaded trees restrict rapid surface drying. Paints protected from direct rainfall tend to accumulate detritus, thus providing nutrients for fungi.

In general, fungi develop more commonly on paint applied on wood surfaces than on metal or masonry, because of the rougher surface. Wood substrates provide nutrients from the water-soluble extractives that diffuse into the paint film.
Prevention of microbial defacement is a critical objective to maintain the aesthetic integrity and useful life of a coating, but dry-film biocide choices are limited by:

  • Global registration status
  • Antimicrobial efficacy spectra—fungi, algae, both
  • Environmental toxicological profile
  • Compatibility with final products

Dry film preservatives are typically blends of an algaecide and one or more fungicides, designed to ensure resistance to a broad range of algae and fungi. The blends are added to the architectural paint, which is then applied to a variety of exterior surfaces.

 

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